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The Recruiter / Client relationship: How Do You Get the Best Result?

23 Jan 14 by Hannah

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We all want to make the most of what we have, so here’s a few tips I think every person who works with Recruitment Consultants should know to ensure they get the most bang for their buck:


Communication is Key

We all know the basics, but how many of us stick by them? Set out your expectations from the start of how you want to work with your Recruiter. They’ll likely ask this of you anyway, but it pays to think about it first. What’s even better is to periodically review and consider if things are working well in the recruitment process and how they could be improved. In terms of communicating throughout the recruitment process – keep this regular! If you really need a role filled yesterday, don’t neglect communications with the people who are trying to make that happen for you. Our aim is to help you increase profitability by finding the best people for your organisation.


Move quickly on candidates

There’s nothing worse than being caught in the cycle of doing “urgent/non-important” tasks at the expense of “non-urgent/important” tasks (like organising that job brief meeting with the Recruitment Consultant or reviewing the resumes of a couple of potential candidates for that role you’re desperately trying to fill). I would argue that anything to do with recruitment of a specific role is important and urgent because it involves your greatest asset: People.When applying for a role, candidates are on a tight-rope-like excitement curve and this excitement can drop off any second, the longer they are not kept engaged.


You can do this by providing feedback to your Recruiter immediately after a candidate been submitted to you, or interviewed by you, and also by locking in interview times as soon as possible. If a candidate is not of interest for your role, you want to provide the Consultant with the same speedy responses because a candidate’s experience (even if they don’t get the role) will be remembered and word will travel to other potential candidates (and other recruiters) of what you’re like to work with.


Consider an exclusive agreement

With a Recruitment Consultancy (or two – though you’d be wise to put Sourced in the mix!). There are huge benefits in choosing to limit the breadth of recruiters you work with. Most significantly is the time and money saved in that you only have one point of contact rather than six different recruiters, half of which you don’t see many good candidates from anyway. As people who work with many agencies will know, often candidates are known to multiple Recruiters. So if you get an agency you don’t normally work with trying to tempt you with unnamed resumes (you may want to check they’ve actually gained permission from candidates to send these resumes in the first place), chances are that the Recruitment Consultants you already work with know them.


Of course, you also want to work with someone who has an extensive network in your area of expertise and a history of success, so you’ll need to do some research, or depending on your preference a formal PSA may be appropriate for an ongoing recruitment relationship.


As a client, discuss what’s going to work best for you and then follow through on it. If your initial expectations aren’t clear enough, then chances are they won’t be met. Let your recruiter know what’s working and what’s not.

Happy recruiting and may all your employees exceed your expectations!